Acute Pancreatitis

  • Blog >
  • Acute Pancreatitis
RSS Feed

Acute Pancreatitis

Acute pancreatitis strikes suddenly, causing severe pain and vomiting. More than 300,000 people are admitted to U.S. hospitals every year due to acute pancreatitis, according to The National Pancreas Foundation.

What causes acute pancreatitis?

If you have gallstones, you may be at increased risk of developing acute pancreatitis. The condition can occur when stones get stuck in the common bile duct and prevent pancreatic fluids from flowing freely. Stones can also force bile to flow back into the pancreas, which may damage it.

You may also develop acute pancreatitis if your calcium or triglyceride levels are very high, or you have an autoimmune disorder, infection, an overactive parathyroid gland, cystic fibrosis or regularly take certain medications. High alcohol consumption can cause pancreatitis, particularly if you've been a heavy drinker for years. In some cases, the cause of acute pancreatitis can't be determined.

What are the symptoms of acute pancreatitis?

Pain from acute pancreatitis is felt in the upper part of the abdomen, although it can extend to your back. The pain may be mild at first, but may become severe and constant and may worsen after you eat or drink alcohol. Other symptoms include fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and a rapid pulse. Prompt treatment is essential if you experience any of these symptoms. The condition can cause bleeding, infections and may even damage your kidneys, lungs and heart if the attack is severe. Although most people recover from acute pancreatitis, the condition can be life-threatening.

How is acute pancreatitis treated?

If your condition is caused by gallstones, you'll need surgery to remove the stones. In some cases, surgery may also be needed to keep your bile ducts open. If you're admitted to the hospital, you'll be given fluids to prevent dehydration caused by vomiting and diarrhea and may receive medication for nausea and pain. Foods and beverages are usually stopped for one to two days after you're admitted to the hospital.

Changing your medications, avoiding alcohol and addressing the causes of high triglyceride or calcium levels may help prevent further bouts of acute pancreatitis. If you have numerous attacks of acute pancreatitis or continue to drink alcohol, the condition can become chronic.

Although it's not always possible to prevent acute pancreatitis, you can reduce your risk by exercising regularly, following a healthy diet and avoiding heavy consumption of alcohol.

Contact Us

Office Hours

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed


"I had a great experience in digestive Medicine associates. My doctor is padilla and also I was seen by Diane. I had a very plesent experience and I higly recommend this center."
- Arianne Almonte

reviews


g
fb



Telehealth/Coronavirus

We are now providing Telehealth services so you do not have to come in to the office. Call us at 305-822-4107 to set up a time for this service. If you have headaches, fever or cough, and have either traveled internationally within the last 14 days or have been in contact with a person or location known or suspected to have been exposed to the Coronavirus (COVID-19), please call the us to reschedule your appointment.

Estamos dando servicio Telehealth para que no tengas que venir a la oficina. Llamenos al 305-822-4107 para darle una cita para este servicio. Si tienes dolor de cabez, fiebre o tos o has viajado afuera del pais en los ultimos 14 dias o has estado en contacto con una persona o lugar con sospecha de haber estado predispuesto a la Coronavirus (Covid-19), por favor llamenos para cambiar su fecha de cita.